Summer Reading Challenge – July Part 1

Hook ‘Em: Read a book that features fishing or fishermen

The first book I read this month was The Fisherman by Chigozie Obioma and it was staggering. I gave it 5 stars on goodreads and even left a tiny one-sentence review: I feel emotionally shredded.

This was basically the first book that popped up when I googled ‘books with fisherman’, and it immediately grabbed my attention because I love reading books from different places in the world and I have a special connection to Africa because of various reasons. Also, shortly after I’d added it to my ‘to-read’ pile, I was browsing Fringe festival events and stumbled upon a spoken word adaption being performed this year. I immediately became super excited because I love spoken word as well, and it was even more meant to be that I should read it.

I did have some expectations as I began reading, as I always do, and unfortunately I felt a bit uninspired by the beginning. But that is because I have read so many novels about boys and their friends or their brothers getting into all sorts of mischief and The Fisherman was just another version but set in Nigeria. I suddenly realised that I could not think of anything I’d read with a troop of little girls roaming around and finding adventures in their own neighbourhood. But that was just the beginning. As the story progressed and got progressively more shocking, my heart went out to the narrator, the youngest of the four main brothers. I was totally invested in the story and in their lives, it was heartbreaking and heart-wrenching and just powerful.

I loved this novel, and I would definitely recommend it. I get that other people might not enjoy a read like this (I told the entire story to my two friends and it is definitely not their thing), but I found it beautiful and horrible and I can’t wait to see how it’s being adapted on stage.

Here are some lines that really jumped out at me:

‘The sparkling white shirt and trousers he wore gave him the appearance of an angel who – caught unawares during a physical manifestation on earth – had his bones broken to prevent him from returning back to heaven.’

‘He spoke in spurts as if his words were tropical grasshoppers that flew out of his mouth and paused, the way a grasshopper perches and hops off, again and again and again until he completed his speech’

I also loved the description of the mother and father as the two ventricles of the home.

It’s the End of the World: Read a book about the end of the world as we know it

After I’d picked up the pieces of my shredded heart I picked up a copy of Station 11 by Emily St. John Mandel from the library. Unfortunately my heart had only a few hours of recovery before it was ripping itself to pieces again. This book was beautiful! I absolutely loved it; the characters, the storytelling, the creativity.

After reading it you could suppose that the way the narration jumps from character to character and from the past to the present to even further in the past is unnecessarily complicated, but it’s really not. Each chapter, each section, each sentence even, is perfectly in tune with the others. This is one of those novels where only what’s necessary to the story, the telling of these characters, is revealed, and is revealed in a perfectly paced narrative that drops these pearls of knowledge to the reader. There is a lot unsaid, but I felt satisfied at the end, and I love these books that come to a natural end like that. I mean, I hate it because it’s beautiful and wonderful and I want to keep reading it forever and I’m angry and sad that it’s over…

Anyway. I loved this book so much I’m going to recommend it to everyone. I’m planning on buying my own personal copy after returning this one to the library and basically force my dad to read it because I know he’d love it too.

Til next time,

Isla

xx

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