Summer Reading Challenge – July Part 2

Take Pride: Read a book written by an LGBTQIA author or that features an LGBTQIA character

I was really excited to read this next book because while I’ve read countless LGB books there have been none with transgender characters (I think), and I’m always keen to read about people who I struggle so hard to understand and yet desperately want to understand. It also had great reviews and a very enticing, gripping blurb.

Damn.

Litte Fish by Casey Plett is about a transgender woman in her thirties who finds out her grandfather may have also been transgender. From this blurb it sounds like this is the main driving force behind the novel but this mystery barely plays a part in the story, her grandfathers life comes up only a handful of times throughout the book.

I was really disappointed with this book and I could be really harsh about it, but at the same time I understand how important it is. I’ve read so many reviews about how this book spoke to them and how they are finally seeing themselves represented on the page, that was actually the best part about reading this book for me. Sure, I may have not liked the writing style, struggled to connect to the characters and found the main character particularly annoying, but I’m glad I read it.

I’m glad I read it, and I hope more transgender literature comes out, something with really beautiful writing, and a truly great story.

School’s Out for Summer: Reread a book you were forced to read in school

For this ‘reading prompt’ (as I’m calling them) I bent the rules a bit because I can’t remember any books I was forced to read in school apart from Sunset Song by Lewis Grassic Gibbon and, while I did enjoy it, it took me about four months to read which is not conducive to a reading challenge where I am already about ten books behind schedule. So I branched out and chose a book I was ‘forced’ to read at uni. That counts, right?

I chose to re-read The City and The City by China Miéville. I really love this book because it’s just such an amazing idea – two cities cohabiting in the same physical space but completely separate from each other – and because it’s a detective/crime novel and I love anything to do with puzzles needing to be solved. My first time reading it I gave it five stars and added it to my favourites on goodreads, but this second time I lowered it to four stars. I would still list it as one of my favourites, largely just because of the idea and the description and the sheer creativity of the two cities. It was the crime part that I was quickly losing interest in, waking up again when there was more description of the seeing of one city and the unseeing of the other city, but that may be just because I have read it before and while I had forgotten part of the mystery, I knew which bits were important and which were not instinctively. My favourite part is definitely the final section, where everything is unveiled, in a sense, to Inspector Borlú as well as to the reader. But I won’t tell you anymore than that, you’ll have to read it to make any sense of it!

The BBC made a tv series out of The City and The City which I couldn’t get to see because we don’t have a tv license, but I’m hoping I can still find some way of watching it maybe when I visit my mum soon… Miéville could write a whole series of stories about the two cities, Besźel and Ul Qoma, and I’d never get bored of them.

Til next time,

Isla

xx

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